Monday, February 7, 2011

Harvard & Babies

According to an article on wsj.com babies who are fed solid food prematurely may have a higher chance of obesity. What does this mean for companies such as Gerber who sell solid food products for babies?

"Infants on formula who are fed solid foods before they are 4 months old have a higher risk of becoming obese by age 3 than those starting later, Harvard researchers said. The findings are considered significant because being overweight or obese as a child increases the likelihood of being so as an adult."

This data from Harvard researchers, who I'd bet on 9 times out of 10, could create a serious problem for companies who sell solid food for babies. If a bunch of mothers now turn away from solid food products then companies like Gerber will see a decrease in consumers. They will most likely discontinue the products if the decrease is significant enough. The decrease in consumers can be attributed to a change in consumer tastes which can be attributed to the data Harvard researchers published. The possibility of your child being obese in childhood affecting the chances your child will be obese in adulthood is what might turn consumers away from feeding their younger babies solid food. Obesity can cause serious health problems and in America today we are making a lot of effort to be more healthy so why wouldn't mothers give their children a head start?

5 comments:

  1. How could the government utilize this research to “help” the American youth?

    ReplyDelete
  2. What do you think companies like Gerber will do to deal with this news?

    ReplyDelete
  3. Obesity is part of American society at this point. Unhealthy food and drink are available around the clock. I believe feeding your child solid food at a young age just contributes to the epidemic. The American public has dug itself into a pretty deep hole and at this point, if the government doesn't step in and moderate the nutritional values of most foods, obesity rates will only continue to rise in the future.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I think this news will affect parents who would consciously make an effort to be healthy in their own lives. Americans know fast food is terrible for us but the chains are still doing well without any sign of this changing. So I think this news will be important to those who make the distinct effort to better their children's health, but not to those who continue to serve their children Happy Meals for dinner because they don't have the time or money to do otherwise.

    ReplyDelete
  5. To Kern:
    If Gerber sees significant decrease in solid baby food sales they may in effect decrease the production of the product and increase in the production of non-solid baby food products to make up for lost costs.

    ReplyDelete